USS Spiegel Grove (LSD-32) Facts....

BUILDER

Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation, Pascagoula, MS

COMMISSIONED

8 June 1956

DECOMMISSIONED

2 October 1989

LENGTH

510'

WIDTH

84'

HEIGHT

79'

TONNAGE

11,200 tons

SPEED

23.5 knots

DRAFT

18'

WELL DECK - 397'

DEPTH - 17'
WIDTH - 48'

POWER

2 12,000 HP steam turbine engines

GUNNERY

3 3" 50 caliber twin mounts (original load-out was 6 twin mounts)

ALLOWANCE

CREW

Officers

19

Enlisted

320

TROOPS

Officers

25

Enlisted

190

BOATS/TRANSPORT CAPACITY

3 Landing Craft utility (LCU), each 119' in length & each fully loaded. In addition, 6 LCM6's can be carried alongside & forward of the LCU's. By reducing the number of LCU's to 2 & the number of LCM's to 5, 10-15 Marine Amphibious Tractors (LVT) can also be carried in the well deck. If desired, a total of 127 2-1/2 ton trucks can be carried utilizing the well deck & superdeck.

Earlier Years Ship's Crest:


From the Latin - "dictum" is something said or a statement; "factum" is a fact or reality. Literal translation (premised on this when Spiegel Grove's Plankowner XO, CDR Douglass Getchell created it) is: Something said is factual or "no sooner said than done". This was more or less our motto. "Service Unlimited" evolved from that premise. We operated on the basis of providing the service requested before the utterance was completely delivered. No task was too great - and time was never a factor.

Later Years Ship's Crest [post mid-60s (appx)]:

The colorful insignia of the USS Spiegel Grove (LSD-32) reflects the pride and professionalism her crew exhibits in their ship and country.

The emblematic representing the Navy and Marine Corps are indicative of the Navy/Marine Corps team and are shown as equals. The ship's outline superimposed over the supporting columns represents Spiegel Grove's mission: Support the Navy/Marine Corps team. All of the above are encompassed in a circle, reflecting the strength inherent in the combination of men and material.

 
"Butt'' is an old synonym for "cask,'' and "scuttle'' means here "a small hole,'' so that "scuttlebutt'' appropriately describes a cask with a hole through which water can be drawn for drinking.

The use of "scuttlebutt'' to mean "gossip or rumor'' derives from the practice of sailors congregating around the water cask and exchanging gossip, in much the same way that office workers are known to converse around the company water cooler.

The earliest record of "scuttlebutt'' in its literal sense is from 1805, while the earliest record of its figurative sense is from 1901.

 

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